Click to Home
CodeRED_FINAL_White.png

PST Self-screening Questionnaire
Public Safety Telecommunicator
Self-screening Questionnaire

A professional public safety telecommunicator is a highly responsible, multi-functional public servant who must handle many tough requirements, often in crises. The nature of the NPD telecommunicator’s job includes these key elements:

  • Mostly sedentary.
  • Operate telephone, radio and computer equipment, usually concurrently.
  • Answer 9-1-1 emergency calls and public inquiries, and dispatch police and fire units.
  • Usually routine call taking and dispatching, but periodically high-stress during emergencies.
  • Work on one of three 8-hour shifts (0700-1500; 1500-2300; 2300-0700).
  • Work with a team of two to four other telecommunicators.
  • Occasional requirement for overtime.

This self-screening questionnaire provides a sense of what it’s like to serve the public as a telecommunicator at the Naples Police Department. It is intended to help you determine whether you are making a sound decision in applying for the position. Therefore, answer the questions honestly…to yourself. You are not required to divulge your answers; however, we will be happy to discuss any aspects of the position requirements.

Work Environment: Are you willing and able to…

Sit (or stand) at a telecommunications console that limits your movements to a 6-foot radius, except during an occasional break?

Yes___

No___

Work an 8-hour shift without regular breaks?

Yes___

No___

Serve on any of three shifts—days, afternoons, or nights—and remain on that shift for several months?

Yes___

No___

Serve on a shift where you might work days (7:00 am-3:00 pm) for several months with Monday and Tuesday off, then be reassigned to the “graveyard” shift (11:00 pm-7:00 am) with Wednesday and Thursday off?

Yes___

No___

Accept periodic last minute changes to your work schedule (such as mandatory overtime) that might require you to cancel personal plans?

Yes___

No___

Work weekends and holidays, possibly for many months based on your duty schedule?

Yes___

No___


Occupational Competency: Are you willing and able to…

Spend the first six months of your employment in a probationary status during which you’ll spend most of your time undergoing on-the-job training, receiving daily mentoring, critiques and evaluations?

Yes___

No___

Read and study numerous procedure manuals, and take written tests on a recurring basis?

Yes___

No___

Learn all facets of a multi-tasking job: call/complaint taking, automated data entry and transfer, law enforcement inquiries, radio communications / dispatching, equipment troubleshooting?

Yes___

No___

Copy information as it is being received over telephone or radio, simultaneously digest what you hear and respond immediately.

Yes___

No___

Periodically travel outside of the local area to attend professional training courses and seminars?

Yes___

No___


Supervision and Evaluation
: Are you willing and able to…

Take direction from your supervisor and other seniors in front of your co-workers?

Yes___

No___

Be closely supervised and questioned routinely about why you followed a certain course of action without taking it personally?

Yes___

No___

Work under constant electronic monitoring that records all telephone and radio transmissions, or logs data entries?

Yes___

No___


Job Stressors: Are you willing and able to…

Deal calmly with angry people when their problems are not your fault?

Yes___

No___

Listen to abusive and profane language over the phone and deal with it impersonally and unemotionally?

Yes___

No___

Deal with a crisis call—where a child has died, an officer injured, a woman assaulted—then set it aside and to calmly deal with another caller who is irate over some relatively minor issue?

Yes___

No___

Comprehend that if you process a call incorrectly, it could contribute to someone’s injury or loss of property, and it might incur liability for the City?

Yes___

No___

 

 

 


If you answered “No” to any of these questions, you may want to reconsider applying for this position.

On the more positive side, a career as a public safety telecommunicator offers some personal rewards, some of which are intangible, such as:

  • Satisfaction that you provide a vital service to the public.
  • Awareness that citizens rely on you as the first “First Responder” to their calls for help.
  • Pride in knowing that on a daily basis you help promote the protection and preservation of life, property, and community security.
  • Knowledge that you serve in a profession that is growing in national recognition.